The central image in my work is the human figure. This is so even if it is absent from a painting. I worked in abstracts but found it limiting. I realised abstract art moves the eye away from what it is to be a human being, subtly fragmenting the sense of personhood, undermining our relationships with both ourselves and others. Therefore I decided to turn to figurative. Fascinated by the physical permanence of work created many hundreds of years ago - compared to 20th Century art that often barely outlives its maker - I researched traditional working methods from the Medieval to the Baroque. Grinding colours from raw pigment, blending eggs, oils, and resins, I began to understand that the remarkable ability for these works to continue to exist was in large part due to a harmonic relationship, a dance between the maker of the work and his materials. I take this idea of physical perpetuation in time and apply it to the transient moment. Working with traditional methods and materials and their inherent power to depict light, the great unifying factor in our world, I found it possible to see, in a glimpse of the world, a story that already exists with its own sense, its own internal logic. It is this that I paint - a story with its own intelligible meaning order and harmony; a story that is its own unsolved mystery.